Friday Rundown: 10.10.14

Good morning and let us be among the first to wish you a happy Columbus Day Weekend. In the news this week: NYSUT, Common Core in relation to improving SAT scores and inadequate funding for upstate schools. If you missed anything, we have you covered. Here’s your Rundown.

In Common Core transition, N.Y. looks to Kentucky (Capital New York)

Pearson’s wrong answer — and why it matters in the high-stakes testing era (Washington Post)

Schools in ‘limbo’ as Cuomo ponders evaluation bill (Capital New York)

Tisch, school groups lukewarm to Cuomo bond proposal (Capital New York)

NYSUT gets permission to intervene in tenure case (Capitol Confidential)…Teachers union challenges ‘gag order’ (Binghamton Press & Sun-Bulletin)

Study on upstate school funding (Albany Times Union)…Statewide #wecantwait education campaign hits home (Binghamton Press & Sun-Bulletin)

Parents have rights in children’s education (Times Herald Record)

Study: New York preschool push benefits wealthier families first (Washington Post)

Opinion: Regents should OK new path to careers (Utica Observer Dispatch)

SAT scores for Class of 2014 show no improvement (Washington Post)…Tisch: Common Core will boost students’ SAT scores (Capital New York)

Campaign calls on Cuomo to sign bill to allow CPR lessons in schools (WTEN)

Friday Rundown 10.3.14

A good Friday morning to you – the first Friday in October! Here’s what you may have missed in education headlines this week.

State officials discuss changes in Regents format (Glens Falls Post Star)

Assemblyman James Skoufis: Stop balancing budgets on the backs of our children (Skoufis press release)

Cuomo announces $22.4 million education grant for NYS (NY.gov)

New York tax system is archaic (Rochester Democrat and Chronicle)

State judge tosses challenge to NY tax cap (Press Connects)

How much time will new Common Core tests take kids to finish? Quite a lot. (Washington Post)

Superintendents share classroom tech successes (Capital New York)

Rethinking the 
high school diploma (Education Next)

In your opinion: New school snacks will help children (The Daily Star)

U.S. Department of Education announces 2014 National Blue Ribbon Schools (Ed.gov)

Hudson Valley schools to stand up for fair funding Sept. 30

FF_rally14_for webAfter a successful advocacy campaign last fall, school districts in the Hudson Valley are at it again.

On Sept. 30, school leaders, boards of educations and community advocacy groups from districts in Orange, Sullivan, Ulster and Dutchess counties, will seek to get the attention of local legislators in the Hudson Valley region by holding an advocacy event aiming to do away with the Gap Elimination Adjustment.

The Regional Advocacy Event: “Fair Funding for Our Schools”, will be held at 7 p.m. Sept. 30 at the Middletown High School in Middletown, NY. The event, sponsored by the Hudson Valley Committee for Fair Funding for Our Schools, will feature Billy Easton, the executive director of the Alliance for Quality Education.

The GEA was first introduced for the 2010-11 fiscal year by then-Governor Paterson as a way to help close New York’s then $10 billion budget deficit. Under the legislation, a portion of the funding shortfall at the state level is divided among all school districts throughout the state and reflected as a reduction in school district state aid. The GEA is a negative number, money that is deducted from the aid originally due to the district. And it means that many school districts have a gaping hole in their budget due to this reduction in aid.

Since the introduction of the GEA, New York schools have lost $7.7 billion in state aid.

“We have a long way to go to guarantee our children’s education will be funded fairly and adequately,” a statement reads on the Fair Funding for Our Schools website. “…Our collective efforts will put politicians on notice that we are unified and we aren’t going away.”

All area parents, community members, taxpayers, educators, and business leaders are invited to attend the event.

If you are planning on attending on Sept. 30, you can connect with us on social media that night and tell us what is happening from your perspective. Tweet us your photos and updates – @edspeaksny, #NYSchoolsinPeril

Ed Speaks has a number of advocacy resources available for you. Check them out here.

AQE launches new campaign: #WeCantWait

#WeCantWait is a powerful statewide photo campaign started by the Alliance for Quality Education, powered by parents, students, teachers and other advocates who believe in the need for urgent action to make funding New York’s public schools a priority.   Here at Ed Speaks we’ve written numerous times about how many NY schools are systematically underfunded, and the #WeCantWait campaign is showing exactly what’s missing from our schools as a result.

What a great idea! Here’s info from the AQE web site on how you can get involved:

Take a #WeCantWait selfie

  • 1) Make a #WeCantWait sign and write why you can’t wait for New York to fully fund public schools. 
(tell the world what your school is missing because of funding cuts).
  • 2) Share that picture across social media with #WeCantWait and at @AQE_NY!

 or email it to chadradock@gmail.com
  • 3) Challenge your friends and family to take their own #WeCantWait selfies to support our schools!

 

Friday Rundown 8.22.14

Happy Friday! It’s one of the last weekends of summer and schools are gearing up to open. The schools receiving Pre-K grant funding have been released just a few weeks before the school year begins. According to recent educational polling, many support common educational standards, but not the Common Core in particular. Some credit this to the poor implementation, funding questions and issues with the standardized tests. Educators are hoping the Pre-K roll out will go more smoothly. Read about this and more in this week’s Friday Rundown stories.

Poll: Common Core support among teachers plummets, with fewer than half supporting it (The Washington Post)

Schools allotted $4M for pre-K programs (Albany Times Union)

Seeking New Start, Finding Steep Cost (New York Times)

Study these schools (New York Daily News)

Comparing PDK and Education Next Polls (Education Next)

Common Core: State pays schools to reduce tests (The Journal News)

Teachout talks education, energy in run vs. Cuomo (Poughkeepsie Journal)

Smart School Act will show it works (Albany Times Union)

Newest Schenectady graduates used summer school as ‘life lesson’ (Daily Gazette)

Obama’s Learning Curve (Wall Street Journal)

Letter: Laptops top list of schools’ needs (The Journal News)

A shocking statistic about the quality of education research (The Washington Post)

NY ‘fixed’ Common Core tests — and scores surged (New York Post)

Friday Rundown 8.8.14

A good Friday morning to you. For most New York school districts, the first day of school is less than a month away. Can you believe that? Here’s your Rundown from the last week.

State Ed releases half of Common Core test questions (Buffalo News)

NY Minute: Cuomo considers tax break, school aid for $4.2 billion in extra cash (Syracuse Post Standard)

School reforms that actually work (The Washington Post)

Three takeaways from The Colbert Report’s teacher-tenure talk (Chalkbeat)

A lesson from South Korea: Student resistance to high-stakes testing (The Washington Post)

Gov. Cuomo signs law requiring coaches to report signs of child abuse (NY Daily News)

Boston Research Finds Kids’ Brains Benefit From Playing Music (WBUR)

Cracking the Girl Code: How to End the Tech Gender Gap (Time)

NY to invest $14M to promote stem cell education (Utica Observer Dispatch)

The Top Twitter Feeds in Education Policy 2014 (Spoiler alert: @edspeaksNY did not make the list, though we would appreciate a follow from you!) (Education Next)

Public schools hurting more in recovery than in recession

Via Ben Casselman of fivethirtyeight.com: While the nation is slowly recovering from the economic recession, public schools are facing growing financial concerns, due in large part to a decrease in federal funding, and an overall drop in school funding in 2012 – the first time that has occurred in 35 years.

Casselman explains that U.S. public schools weathered the recession relatively well because federal stimulus dollars helped to plug the funding gap, offsetting the decrease in state funding. But between 2010-2012, federal per-student funding decreased 20 percent and has continued to drop since then. From the piece:

“The cuts are increasingly hitting classrooms directly. In the recession and the early stages of the recovery, superintendents were largely able to protect instructional expenses such as teacher salaries by cutting from other areas, such as administration and maintenance. But that has become more difficult over time. In the 2011-12 school year, classroom spending fell faster than overall spending.”

According to the piece, urban districts have been hit particularly hard by the federal aid cuts. Nearly 90 percent of big-city school districts spent less per student in 2012 than when the recession ended in 2009.

“The cuts haven’t been evenly distributed. Most federal education aid targets two groups, low-income and special education students, who are overrepresented in urban school districts. As a result, urban districts have been hit harder by the recent cuts. (For the same reason, urban districts also disproportionately benefited from the stimulus.) Overall, 64 percent of the nation’s more than 14,000 school districts spent less per student in 2012 than in 2009, after adjusting for inflation. But 82 percent of urban districts cut funding; in cities with populations of 250,000 or more, 89 percent of districts cut funding.”

casselman-feature-schools-4New York public schools are all too familiar with this reality. Superintendents and school officials around the state have been outspoken with their displeasure of the Gap Elimination Adjustment, holding rallies and even taking their argument of funding discrimination to court. They’ve also expressed frustration with state’s tax levy cap.

Question: Are you surprised by how widespread the funding epidemic is?

 

POV: Students are fighting for our future

Points_view

Today’s POV comes to us from Dan Adamek, a senior at Herkimer Junior-Senior High School.  Dan serves as president of the student council, the founder of Students for Fair Funding – New York, and organizes with the Alliance for Quality Education. This article originally appeared in the Utica Observer-Dispatch on April 21, 2014.

I am a high school senior. On April 10, I should have been eating lunch in my school’s cafeteria worrying about my next test. Instead, I found myself with more than 100 of my peers marching in a mock funeral that symbolized the death of the Herkimer Central School District.

This action was initiated and led by students in a collective effort to end the epidemic of what activists across the state have dubbed as “Cuomo cuts.”

Throughout my high school career, I have not once heard of the introduction of new programs that will enhance my educational experience, nor have I had the opportunity to take classes that will give me an advantage in the globalized, 21st century job market. In fact, I have seen my school district in a constant state of attrition.

This is not because of my community, teachers or school administration. It is not because I have failed to make a conscious effort to self-educate and work diligently. It is, however, because of the systematic orchestration of the failure of schools all around New York state by Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

Students at Herkimer High School took action because before austerity hit the education system, our elementary school offered character education. In those character education classes we learned about the golden rule. We learned that we should treat others the way we want to be treated.

It is evident that our governor has yet to fully grasp this idea. If he did, he would clearly be fulfilling his duty to provide students with a quality education as outlined in the New York state Constitution. He would certainly not be balancing the state budget on the back of young children through the Gap Elimination Adjustment — a policy that has stolen more than $8.4 billion from schools around New York state since its inception. Nor would he continually fail to put New York back on track with its commitment to the Campaign for Fiscal Equity court order.

Herkimer students acted because in our history classes — the few that are still offered — we have been taught that in the face of adversity, change will not happen with inaction and apathy. Herkimer students realize that the pages of history books are plastered with the struggles of oppressed peoples.

We, the students, are being oppressed by your lack of equitable education funding that thereby deprives us of our right to a quality education, Mr. Governor, and we do not plan on quieting down anytime soon. Each of us is filled with rage, and that rage will not go away until our demands are met and our rights are upheld.

Unions will ‘Picket in the Pines’ to protest pro-charter education summit headlined by Cuomo

Teachers’ unions and other public education groups are planning to head to Lake Placid’s Camp Philos next month to protest a pro-charter education conference there. The conference will be hosted by the nonprofit group Education Reform Now and feature Gov. Andrew Cuomo as “honorary chairman.”

In response, New York State United Teachers (NYSUT) and the Alliance for Quality Education (AQE) are organizing “Picket in the Pines” outside of Camp Philos on Sunday, May 4 to push back against the pro-charter agenda and “put the ‘public’ back in public education.”

From the NYSUT website on the upcoming event:

“For too long, so-called ‘reformers’ have drowned out the voices of parents and teachers. These hedge-fund propagandists have contributed to New York State’s Common Core mess, the (failed) In-Bloom push for student data, and the spread of corporate charters that undermine public schools serving all kids.”

Last week, it was made public that the cost of admission to the camp ranges from $1,000 to $2,500. The top-price ticket includes a VIP reception and a listing on the event’s website. That price tag has already brought about criticism by public education lobbyists, who say this will likely be an event consisting mostly of pro-charter hedge funders.

Capital New York is reporting that some public school parents and teachers have complained that they’re being barred from attending the conference. Via Jessica Bakeman:

“Gail DeBonis Richmond, a retired teacher, said she registered for the event on April 15 and received two confirmation emails before receiving a refund on her $1,000 registration fee two days later. She said she was told that the event was at capacity before she attempted to register.”

Unbelievably, the executive director of Education Reform Now, Joe Williams, said he didn’t anticipate that there would be so much interest in the event. From Capital New York:

“Given the unexpected interest, the event is now over capacity, and we have had to turn away some applicants due to space limitations,” he (Williams) continued. “We regret not being able to welcome everyone, but we are excited to continue these conversations after Camp Philos on a much broader scale.”

Williams went on to say he expects to target a bigger venue for next year’s conference.

The deadline to register for “Picket in the Pines” is April 30.

Kids Speak Week: “I’m asking for all small schools like us to be funded the way we should be.”

Kidspk

Today’s Kids Speak Week post is from Catalina Rusaw, a junior at Brasher Falls Central High School.

Currently there is a budget cut calling for all the arts at my school to be cut. What does that mean for me? That means that all the programs I am included in, that make me look forward to going to school, that help me enjoy high school will no longer be available for me. What does that mean for other students? They will be lessened a college opportunity. Some of these kids depend on these programs for scholarships, for a career. The state owes small public schools like us over 3 million dollars. Why haven’t we seen any of this money? Because of something called the Gap Elimination Adjustment (GEA). This is the reason most small schools are in fiscal peril. This started first back in 2010, in the first four years schools have lost $7.7 billion in state aid that was promised to us by law. That averages out to about $2,895 per student. Schools only have two options raise property taxes or cut programs, services and staff. Because Brasher Falls is such a small school district, we can’t raise the taxes anymore because nobody has the income to pay for them so we are forced to cut the arts. I’m asking for all small schools like us to be funded the way we should be.